Friday links: utter absurdity

22Sep06

This week has been a hectic one, so please sit back, relax and enjoy the last linkfest of the week.

Rebecca Knight at the FT.com on the prospects for, and pros and cons of, actively managed ETFs.

John Spence at Marketwatch.com takes a closer look at some “quasi-active” ETFs from Claymore Securities. Jen Ryan at TheStreet.com weighs in as well.

Katie Benner at TheStreet.com has more information on a forthcoming currency strategy ETF.

Hal Bodley in the USA Today profiles Billy Beane of Moneyball fame on the importance of flexibility and adaptation.

A team of writers at the Wall Street Journal report on the difficulty facing large financial institutions with in-house hedge fund managers.

Henry Blodget in Slate.com on why we shouldn’t be all that surprised by hedge fund blow-ups.

Jeff Matthews on the most recent case of utter absurdity that is the options backdating scandal.

Chet Currier at Bloomberg.com on the inescapability of risk when it comes to hedge funds (and housing).

DealBook notes no great rush by hedge funds to withdraw their SEC registration.

CXO Advisory Group reviews a paper on the generally poor timing of mutual fund investors.

James Picerno at the Capital Spectator on the state of the economic slowdown.

Saul Hansell in the New York Times looks at the issues surrounding a potential Yahoo!-Facebook deal.

DealBook explores the range of valuations for Facebook.

Ronald Grover at BusinessWeek.com on why John Malone desires DirecTV.

Trader Mike with a heads up on the approaching launch of WallStrip.com.

Miguel Helft in the New York Times reports on how corporations are pulling back from their venture capital investments.

Chicago Cubs fans around the world have their fingers crossed in anticipation of a break-up of the Tribune Co. and a change in team ownership.

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