Wednesday links: corporate cupidity

14Mar07

Would you hand over your hard-earned capital over to someone who just lost some $6 billion? (via TheStreet.com)

Jenny Anderson in the New York Times on how, “Hedge funds have drawn increasing attention from investors as well as from regulators who are grappling with how to handle the sector.”

Felix Salmon on whether there is enough alpha to go around for all the hedge funds chasing it.

All About Alpha on the expected adoption rate of hedge fund replication strategies.

Doron Levin at Bloomberg.com on the attraction of “almost worthless Chrysler” to a trio of high profile buyout firms.

Is General Motors (GM) going to take a subprime mortgage market hit? (via TheStreet.com)

Speaking of GM also announced a significant change in asset allocation for its pension fund assets. (via CNNMoney.com)

Greg Newton at NakedShorts with another example of corporate cupidity.

Is the push by Silicon Valley into alternative energy investments a replay of the Internet Boom? (via New York Times)

Daniel Gross weighs in the role of bubbles in market history.

Kris Hudson in the Wall Street Journal on the rise in share buybacks (and dividends) at major retailers.

Adam Warner at the Daily Options Report passes along some interesting statistics on the state of the market.

Barry Ritholtz at the Big Picture with a primer on CDOs.

Brett Steenbarger at TraderFeed on how best to utilize his weblog.

Tom Lydon at ETF Trends with a look at how investors should think about the new crop of ETFs.

CXO Advisory Group on the value of institutional-based sentiment measures.

David Altig at macroblog on rising foreclosures and delinquencies due in part to ARMs.

Bill Sjostrom at Truth on the Market on why majority voting for corporate directors has not worked as well as some have hoped.

Menzie Chinn at Econbrowser on the shrinking term spread around the world.

Is Google Finance catching up with Yahoo Finance? (via TheStreet.com)

Will Barak Obama’s bum investment record make him a better President? (via Slate.com)

To all of our readers, new and old, you can always pass along any feedback, questions and/or comments.

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