Wednesday links: newbie trader advice

11Apr07

Joanna Slater at WSJ.com on the growing influence of investors on holdings in the emerging markets.

Heidi Moore at Financial News on how ‘distressed fund’ managers are playing both sides of the street in bankruptcies as debt and equity holders.

Tom Lauricella at WSJ.com on the growing ranks of activist mutual fund managers.

Isn’t your stock price supposed to rise after you axe 17,000 employees? (via DealBook)

Joe Mysak at Bloomberg.com asks “Why can Harvard borrow in the tax-exempt municipal bond market?”

Should Goldman Sachs (GS) spin-off its hedge fund business? (via DealBreaker.com)

Exxon Mobil (XOM) is now the “undisputed” world leader in market cap. (via Ticker Sense)

David Merkel at the Aleph Blog has an intriguing proposal for the newly fashionable railroad industry.

Brett Steenbarger at TraderFeed with advice for newbie traders who are losing money.

Mark Hulbert at Marketwatch.com on Vanguard’s new bond ETFs and the challenges of bond market timing.

Jaime Peters at Morningstar.com reviews the impact of further mortgage market weakness on various banks’ bottom lines.

Accrued Interest on why bond fund turnover is logically higher than equity funds.

Tom Lydon at ETF Trends on what demographic change might have on your ETF investments.

All About Alpha has a two-part interview with Thomas Schneeweis, editor of the Journal of Alternative Investments.

Jason Zweig at CNNMoney.com catches up with Robert Shiller and his views on real estate and risk.

Jeff Matthews has some insight into how Apple’s iPhone may do in the crowded cellphone marketplace.

Adam Warner at the Daily Options Report has “Milwaukee” (among other things) on the mind.

Jonathan A. Knee at WSJ.com reviews the highly publicized tell-all book on Lazard, The Last Tycoons.

Did you know Berkshire Hathaway (BRKa) owned Orange Julius? (via Mental Floss)

With a plethora of deep-pocketed bidders it seems like the one thing the Chicago Cubs can’t screw up is the sale of the team. (via New York Times)

Thanks for checking in. Your feedback is always appreciated.

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