Wednesday links: gasoline gap

16May07

Erin White and Joann S. Lublin at WSJ.com on private equity’s “thirst for management talent” and why corporate CEOs are eager to join the private equity industry.

David Enrich at WSJ.com on the disclosure that Eddie Lampert of ESL Investments has purchased a notable stake in Citigroup (C).

DealBook, FT Alphaville, Chad Brand, Felix Salmon and Fly on the Wall look at what this may mean for Citigroup and its embattled management.

John Carney at DealBreaker.com on the prisoner’s dilemma and whether the Bancroft family should trust Rupert Murdoch with the Wall Street Journal.

DealBook has a look at the first earnings report from Fortress Investment Group (FIG).

All About Alpha has a closer look at a paper that answers “where alphas come from.”

Does the public need to buy stocks en masse to bring about a market top? (via MarketBeat)

Oh no, Lenny is back! Thankfully, Adam Warner at the Daily Options Report is on the case.

Accrued Interest on the use (and abuse) of historical yield statistics.

Mebane Faber at World Beta on the bounceback in the returns to a moving-average asset allocation strategy.

Grace Wong at CNNMoney.com on whether the hot IPO market is luring companies before they are ready for the public markets.

Erin Swanson at Morningstar.com looks at where the subprime mortgage market goes from here.

James Altucher at TheStreet.com has a high yield twist on the BRIC phenomenon.

Brett Steenbarger at TraderFeed has accumulated some notable links on the value of keeping a trading journal.

Barry Ritholtz at the Big Picture pulls together some links on impact of housing on GDP.

Bespoke Investment Group with a graphical depiction of the “CPI Comfort Zone.”

Bill Byrnes at the MUTUALdecision Blog on how investors can “naturally hedge” higher gasoline prices.

We are not necessarily “peak oil” believers, but this post by James Hamilton at Econbrowser.com should give one pause.

Dave Kansas at WSJ.com has a review of Curtis Faith’s Way of the Turtle.

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