Tuesday links: widespread optimism

29May07

Henny Sender at WSJ.com on a growing rift in the private equity industry on the wisdom of today’s deal-making environment.

Felix Salmon and Jim Cramer with some reasons why the private equity boom may not be over just yet.

FT Alphaville with some updated performance numbers for the private equity industry.

Justin Lahart at WSJ.com on hedge funds using the credit default swaps market as a hedge against a stock market drop.

John Carney at DealBreaker.com on the shift of power (and brains) away from investment banks to private equity firms.

Gregory Zuckerman at WSJ.com on the outflows of both capital and personnel at John Henry & Co.

FT Alphaville notes the “widespread optimism” surrounding emerging stock markets.

Bears rule the most recent Ticker Sense Blogger Sentiment Poll.

CXO Advisory Group investigates if there is an exploitable trading pattern around three-day weekends.

Random Roger on how he might use the new buy-write ETN in a portfolio.

Adam Warner at the Daily Options Report on how one might play the buy-write ETN against a closed-end fund cousin.

All About Alpha on why it makes more sense to attempt to replicate broad hedge fund indices versus more narrowly defined return streams.

Bespoke Investment Group on what stocks have historically performed well in the summer months.

Barry Ritholtz at the Big Picture on why it might pay to keep an eye on the mention of “recessions” in the media.

Kevin Kelleher on the frenzy surrounding online ad firms and the notes how Amazon.com (AMZN) stock price just keeps going.

James Surowiecki in the New Yorker on why it will take more than financial engineering to turn Chrysler around.

Brett Steenbarger at TraderFeed on the value of ‘positive focus’ and ‘measurable and achievable goals’ in trader coaching.

Jim Cramer at New York responds to the “Cramer haters” and that includes himself.

Thom Lambert at Truth on the Market on the descent of the “City of Broad Shoulders” descent into paternalism.

Mind Hacks points to an article on the paradoxes of “mental accounting.”

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