Thursday links: CDO confusion

28Jun07

Barry Ritholtz at the Big Picture is skeptical that the CDO problem is now “well contained.”

Paul Murphy at FT Alphaville on opacity in CDO pricing and where that leaves hedge funds and the high yield market.

Felix Salmon at Market Movers on scaremongering and the actual state of the credit markets.

Going Private on the widespread instinct to conflate bad financial bets into actual crimes.

Jeff Miller at A Dash of Insight on how problems already widely noted are less likely to affect the markets.

Quote of the day (related to trading): “If you can find something everyone agrees on, it’s wrong.” – Mo Udall (via Quotations Page)

Calculated Risk on the use of the “green shoe” and the Blackstone Group (BX) offering.

Another company looks to change their capital allocation in the private equity era. (via WSJ.com)

Gwen Robinson at FT Alphaville on the “irrelevance of today’s Wall Street banker.”

Doug Kass at TheStreet.com on how the “slope of the economic cycle” will affect the credit markets.

James Hamilton at Econbrowser on “housing’s continued struggles” and the saggy state of the U.S. economy.

Random Roger on the long term consequences of inflation, illustrated through the price of first class postage.

Brett Steenbarger at TraderFeed on just how one should go about “learning how to trade.”

Robert Frank at the Wealth Report on why the wealthy are pulling back their hedge fund investments.

Jim Wiandt at IndexUniverse.com on what new ETFs he would like to see launched.

Hal R. Varian in the New York Times breaks down the global economic value of an Apple iPod.

Russel Kinnel at Morningstar.com with eight questions facing the mutual fund world.

In response to our post on options as an asset class, a reader sent along a link to this options site.

Paul Kedrosky at Infectious Greed points to a free-wheeling Time.com interview with Rupert Murdoch.

Greg Mankiw takes a closer look at Warren Buffett’s tax bill.

Thanks for checking with Abnormal Returns, where your feedback is always appreciated.

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