Monday links: book value blues

09Jul07

Gwen Robinson at FT Alphaville on the superficial similarities between private equity and hedge funds and their substantial differences as public companies.

All About Alpha for the potential for a bubble in the stocks of hedge fund managers.

Siobhan Hughes at WSJ.com on the wave of hedge funds that have de-registered with the SEC.

Roddy Boyd in the New York Post on the big markdowns in the value of the stock specialist business. (more at Marketwatch.com)

In regards to the homebuilder stocks, “…book value is more of a moving target than a sure sign of a bargain.” (via WSJ.com)  More on the homebuilders from Barry Ritholtz.

Adam Warner at the Daily Options Report on the importance of paying attention to market volatility.

Bespoke Investment Group notes a pretty low likelihood of a Fed rate cut by year-end 2007.

Joanna Ossinger at MarketBeat on the not-so-great earnings expectations for Q2 2007.

The Ticker Sense Blogger Sentiment Poll is stuck in neutral.

John Hussman at Hussman Funds, “In short, investors should not simply assume that low interest rates are “good” and high interest rates are “bad.” The facts are much more subtle.”

CXO Advisory Group on a paper demonstrating long-term reversal effects in UK shares.

Barry Barnitz at Financial page points to a paper that examines the changing return dynamics of emerging market equities.

Paul A. Larson at Morningstar.com on “What every would-be investor should know about China.”

Calculated Risk on the slowdown in mortgage equity withdrawal and the slowdown in personal consumption expenditures.

Charles Kirk at the Kirk Report on how to approach socially responsible investing.

Value Blog Review with the “top five blogs for a new investor or trader – first half 2007.”

Keith Johnson at WSJ.com on a roadblock to renewable energy growth – a shortage of windmills.

Nick Schulz at American.com on the battle for talent in the ‘IQ business.’

Abnormal Returns is now featuring sponsored links from the likes of Optionistics.com. Sponsorship inquiries are always welcome.

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