Monday links: poverty of attention

16Jul07

Bespoke Investment Group examines the average distance from 52-week highs by market cap and sector.

Sonya Morris at Morningstar.com with a bottoms-up valuation analysis of the market and various sector ETFs.

The Ticker Sense Blogger Sentiment Poll shows a slight uptick in bulls.

Kemba J. Dunham at WSJ.com on the prospects for the now reeling REIT sector.

Barry Ritholtz at the Big Picture wonders if the items that make up the proverbial “wall of worry” have already been well-discounted (and blogged).

Are investors more worried about Asia than the subprime mess? (via FT Alphaville)

Bill Rempel, a.k.a NO DooDahs! wonders “Is sub-prime this year’s bird flu?”

Yves Smith at naked capitalism on the deficiencies of current rating agency models.

Calculated Risk on the deficiencies of “mark to model.”

Speaking of “mark to model”, Greg Newton at NakedShorts on forthcoming hedge fund performance reports for June.

Gwen Robinson at FT Alphaville on the convergence between investment banks, hedge funds and private equity.

The Epicurean Dealmaker examines the “carefully orchestrated plan” behind the rumors of a Vodafone/Verizon deal.

Felix Salmon at Market Movers on why the SEC should be investigating Whole Foods (WFMI) CEO John Mackey.

Adam Warner at the Daily Options Report on a “very risky” way of playing announced deals.

Alea highlights a paper that examines the risk of correlated default, high leverage and forced asset sales…..in 1763!

CXO Advisory Group on research testing the ability to distinguish consistently outperforming hedge funds.

Brett Steenbarger at TraderFeed asks, “Do traders prefer winning trades or making money?”

The Financial Philosopher has assembled a stellar “financial blog portfolio” so as to overcome the “poverty of attention.”

James Surowiecki in the New Yorker on the tension between a desire for safety and fuel economy.

Chris Gaylord at csmonitor.com on how economists are mining data from eBay auctions to learn why shoppers act irrationally.

Optionistics, an options analytics site, is inaugural sponsor of Abnormal Returns. If you want to be next in line to sponsor us, please contact us.

Advertisements


%d bloggers like this: