Monday links: guidance irrelevance

23Jul07

Peter A. McKay at WSJ.com on the seeming irrelevance of earnings guidance.

Herb Greenberg at Marketwatch.com on the companies that keep to themselves and avoid earnings guidance.

Bear Stearns (BSC), yes that Bear Stearns is in the ETN business. Greg Newton at NakedShorts takes note.

Felix Salmon at Market Movers on some still unanswered questions about the Bear Stearns hedge fund implosion.

What will a Rupert Murdoch ownership mean for Barron’s? (via NYTimes.com)

Matthew Sheahan and Samantha Young at IDD.com on the “buyer’s market” facing investment banks as they bring high yield deals to market in the Fall. (via Paul Kedrosky)

Another venue for trading private placements is coming from a consortium of investment banks. (via DealBook)

Kurt Andersen at New York asks “Are private-equity guys being unfairly singled out for the sins of our hypercapitalist age?”

Is a change in 12b-1 fees in the offing? (via TheStreet.com)

The Ticker Sense Blogger Sentiment Poll shifts towards the bears.

Adam Warner at the Daily Options Report, ” I can’t fathom the mind set that blames all selloffs on some malevolent force, while all runups are real.”

Howard Lindzon has an message for perma-bear Bill Fleckenstein.

The dk Report on market timing indicators, including this: “There is no such thing as a perfect timing indicator. Period.”

“Many investors fail in this world due to their fear of losing money.” (via chrisperruna.com)

“The ethanol reality hasn’t fully sunk in on Wall Street.” (via Bloomberg.com)

Paul Kedrosky at Infectious Greed on what it takes to keep your board of directors happy.

Jeff Matthews thinks the iPhone should cause other cellphone makers to go back to the drawing board.

Hugo Lindgren at New York with a profile of economist, blogger and author Tyler Cowen.

Does rising income inequality harm the middle class? (via American.com)

America’s caffeine addiction keeps growing. (via Newsweek.com)

Optionistics, an options analytics site, is the inaugural sponsor here at Abnormal ReturnsSponsorship inquiries are always welcome.

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