Thursday links: (in)sincere apologies

16Aug07

Economist.com on how the new financial order is facing a difficult, but necessary, test.

Are there any bargains out there yet? (via FT Alphaville)

Jon Markman at MSN Money has tracked down five widely divergent opinions on the market.

What does it mean now that the VIX is at four-year highs? (via Daily Options Report)

Barry Ritholtz at the Big Picture on the ‘negativity bubble’ and the importance of tangible sentiment measures.

David Merkel at the Aleph Blog on the “concentration of risk” and the state of the current market.

Doug Kass at TheStreet.com on the real, economic spillover effects of the subprime mortgage mess.

John Carney at DealBreaker.com on the challenge in assessing the “popularity of certain quant factors.”

Aaron Pressman at BusinessWeek.com on the oh-so gracious “man of the hour.”

Has the Fed already eased? (via MarketBeat)

So sorry to have lost your money. Gregory Zuckerman at WSJ.com on the fine art of hedge fund apologies.

Mark Gilbert at Bloomberg.com and Paul Kedrosky at Infectious Greed with their own takes on the trend of hedge fund apologies.

Accrued Interest with an indication of retail investor de-leveraging.

Free exchange on the dangers of relying on single market valuation measure.

VIX and More with another look at the 1998 vs. 2007 analogy.

All About Alpha on growing criticism of the prime brokerage industry.

CXO Advisory Group on the importance of transaction costs in momentum strategies.

Heather Bell at IndexUniverse.com has some background on the new Market Vectors Nuclear Energy ETF.

Wikinvest.com gets a shout out from Bespoke Investment Group.

Freakonomics assembles a quorum to discuss the housing bubble.

Buffetologists are soon to be seen jumping on the Obama bandwagon. (via Marketwatch.com)

The credit crunch spreads. Tim Swanson at the Hollywood Deal on a slowdown in film finance.

The science behind what makes a great movie. (via Science Blog)

Thanks for checking in with Abnormal Returns where your feedback is always appreciated.

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