Thursday links: rescue heroes

23Aug07

With spreads widening, some esteemed investors are looking for value in junk and mortgage-backed securities. (via WSJ.com)

The Economist.com on the difference between market “calm and complacency.”

“Market cassandras” have had their day in the sun. What next? (via BusinessWeek.com)

David Merkel at the Aleph Blog on the “money market malaise.”

What has become of the ‘private equity put’? (via FT Alphaville)

The KKR initial public offering is on hold. Or not.

Goldman’s quant hedge funds are on the mend. (via DealBook)

Wily fund managers will preempt any changes on carried interest taxes. (via DealBreaker.com)

Aaron Task at TheStreet.com believes the ratings agencies are going to face “headline risk” for some time to come.

A (creative) interpretation of how Bank of America (BAC) came to invest in Countrywide Financial (CFC). (via NakedShorts)

David Gaffen at MarketBeat asks “Did Countrywide give away the store?”

Howard Lindzon looks at opportunities in the sagging homebuilding sector.

Adam Warner at the Daily Options Report on the “VIX dip.”

Mebane Faber at World Beta updates his work on endowment fund-like investing strategies.

Bill Rempel has updated his links page with some interesting, newer, blogs.

Brett Steenbarger at TraderFeed writes “Markets cannot stress us out unless we appraise them in ways that make them personal threats.”

There is nothing worse than paying active management fees for (sub) index-like returns. (via Morningstar.com)

Alea on research that that demonstrates the value-destruction tendencies of “illiquidity.”

James Hamilton at Econbrowser writes “Who knew holding short-term Treasuries could be so exciting?”

Econocator highlights a multi-factor recession probability model.

Robin Greenwood at HBS Working Knowledge reviews the results of hedge fund activism.

Melissa Lafsky at Freakonomics highlights a new book on “a new breed of number crunchers.”

What?!? I can’t hear you!?! Excessive noise poses a long term health risk. (via Informed Reader)

Thanks for checking in with Abnormal Returns where your feedback is always appreciated (and read).

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