Wednesday links: capital preservation

07Nov07

Distressed investors are waiting for the other shoe to drop in the credit markets. (WSJ.com)

In the wake of bubbles, investors and boards seeking new CEOs naturally look for high-profile internal candidates who weren’t complicit in the damaging bubble-era decisions.” (Slate.com)

An open letter to bank boards on the question of capital preservation. (Accrued Interest)

Loss severity rates on mortgages are “painfully high”. (FT Alphaville)

“…an inflationary spiral coming out of China…” (Jeff Matthews)

Fed rate cuts have wrought commodity-led inflation. (Big Picture)

Putting the recent upswing in commodity prices into a longer term perspective. (Crossing Wall Street)

An index heavy hitter, Northern Trust (NTRS) new competitor is jumping into the ETF pool. (IndexUniverse.com)

“But it is sad when we invest in hedge funds or private equity or “name brand” stocks in hope of extra returns without recognizing that we are paying for cachet.” (Fortune.com)

Smaller hedge funds have outperformed this year-to-date. (InstitutionalInvestor.com)

Historical bull and bear markets for the U.S. Dollar Index. (Bepoke Investment Group)

The previous summer’s performance tells us little about the “Halloween indicator.” (Barrons.com)

Activist investor Nelson Peltz is transforming the food industry. (WSJ.com)

How to trade a washed out stock. (Daily Options Report)

General Motors (GM) $39 writedown of deferred tax assets explained. (Interfluidity via Market Movers)

Research into “Active Shares” and a fund’s ability to outperform a benchmark. (CXO Advisory Group)

“Focus on the next decade, not the next quarter.” (Morningstar.com)

Five, obvious, ETFs that “fool no one.” (IndexUniverse.com)

Experts are not often that expert. (NYTimes.com, naked capitalism)

What is going on with electricity price deregulation? (Market Movers)

An interesting look at the “Googleconomy.” (Silicon Alley Insider)

The United States is the promised land for wind power. (NYTimes.com)

Reviews of recent “pop-econ” books. (Undercover Economist)

A couple of interesting sports econ statistics. (Odd Numbers)

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