Thursday links: unintended consequences

24Jan08

A good round-up of the SocGen $7.1 billion trading fraud. (Alea, ibid)

Did the Fed’s move set a bad precedent for “Pavlovian” equity market participants? (Big Picture)

A look at big intraday swings. (Infectious Greed)

What happens after an asset class has a really bad month? (World Beta)

“Is it the greatest arbitrage opportunity of the century?” (DealBook)

A time examination of long-short mutual funds. (Morningstar.com)

Not all 130/30 funds are quantitatively managed. (All About Alpha)

More evidence that investors chase returns. (CXO Advisory Group)

Where are all the stock buybacks? (WSJ.com)

IPOs are getting pulled. (DealBook, FT.com)

Is asset-backed commercial paper making a comeback? (Zero Beta)

Solutions proffered to solve the monoline bond insurer crisis. (naked capitalism, TheStreet.com, A Dash of Insight)

Ratchet down your expectations for hedge funds and private equity funds. (Information Arbitrage)

“(F)irms that successfully combine banking and investment banking will walk away with the prize, by being able to offer a full range of services to clients…” (WSJ.com)

Some useful graphs on the scope of recessions and bear markets. (Bespoke Investment Group)

What say members of the NBER Business Cycle Dating Committee on the prospects for a recession. (Real Time Economics)

Another indicator that indicates recession. (Calculated Risk)

Despite a blip set off by the emergency Fed rate cut, markets are still betting on a recession in 2008. (Econbrowser)

Are things as “bad as all that“? (Free Exchange)

Even the most expedient fiscal policy acts with a lag. (Mankiw Blog, Freakonomics)

A timely review of the law of unintended consequences. (Marginal Revolution)

Speaking of unintended consequences, don’t ever invite Equity Private into your offices. (Going Private)

Thanks for checking in with Abnormal Returns. We appreciate (and read) any all feedback.

Advertisements


%d bloggers like this: