Monday links: dividend growth (or not)

21Apr08

“After decades of moving up and down more or less in tandem, the relationship between commodity prices and bond yields has broken down, leaving a yawning gap between them.” (WSJ.com)

MacroShares is planning a sequel to its up/down oil ETFs. (Marketwatch.com)

Credit-related losses have not yet been fully realized in the financial sector. (Big Picture)

“The bank recapitalizations are one of the few areas where it’s possible to invest multibillion-dollar sums right now on a leveraged basis (all banks, by their nature, are leveraged) without having to actually borrow money from someone.” (Market Movers)

The Bank of England is swapping debt to help get bank lending going again. (Prince of Wall Street)

A principles-based system offers the potential for smarter regulation—the kind that helps markets work more efficiently. But the best principles in the world won’t help much if those in charge aren’t willing to enforce them.” (NewYorker.com)

Dividend growth is expected to stagnate this year. (WSJ.com)

More earnings are coming from overseas. (MarketBeat)

Market timers have not yet embraced the rally. (Marketwatch.com)

The VIX has mean-reverted below 20. (Daily Options Report)

Carl Icahn reportedly likes the Blockbuster (BBI) bid for Circuit City (CC). (Silicon Alley Insider, DealBreaker.com)

Research shows “In general, VIX tends to decrease as the number of daylight hours increases and average temperature rises.” (CXO Advisory Group)

Context matters when it comes to the presentation of business news. (Freakonomics)

Somebody is hurting for blogging material. (Epicurean Dealmaker)

Looking past the end of this easing cycle. (Economist’s View)

“This year alone, the railroads will spend nearly $10 billion to add track, build switchyards and terminals, and open tunnels to handle the coming flood of traffic.” (WashingtonPost.com)

Building a better (farmed) fish. (Fortune.com)

A state-by-state map of “where the news breaks.” (strange maps)

Tensions build between sports teams and bloggers. (NYTimes.com, The Big Lead)

The MLB mega-contract is being replaced by something altogether more rational. (Odd Numbers)

Thanks to every one who has contributed to Abnormal Returns. The tip jar remains open.

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