Sunday links: market bottom callers

06Jul08

In a world of 2.5% returns you have to focus on what you can control.  (Barrons.com)

A lost decade for stocks. “Adjusted for inflation and dividends the return on the S&P 500 was negative for the decade that ended on June 30.”  (MarketBeat)

When times are tough, an emphasis on damage control can overshadow the more prudent weighing of risks versus rewards. When times are good, a false sense of security dulls the attention paid to what can go wrong.”  (FT.com)

The “bottom callers” are still out in full force.  (Big Picture)

“(I)f I have one opinion, it’s that volatility underprices risk right now, but that’s 2 sided directional risk.”  (Daily Options Report)

How might the 21st Century look different to investors of today?  (World Beta)

India, the bear case.  (BusinessWeek.com, Fundamental Insights)

What is the materials sector telling us about the global economy?  (TraderFeed)

Losing streak aside, Japan may still be a a safe haven.  (FT Alphaville)

“(G)etting some timber in your portfolio is more easily said than done.”  (Bull Bear Trader)

Currency ETFs have opened up the world of currency investing for individual investors.  (Barrons.com)

The opportunity in high yield munis.  (WSJ.com)

For VCs, “..the only way to make a decent return on their money may be to give some of it back first.”  (breakingviews/WSJ.com)

“(W)hen those fair-market values are rising, nobody at the banks is interested in educating anybody about their unreliability. ”  (Curious Capitalist)

“Stockmarkets may well be retreating because, whichever way the inflation scare plays out, profits are sure to take a hit.”  (Economist.com)

“(T)he United States net international investment position is in far better shape than anyone could realistically have hoped after ten years of large current account deficits.”  (Brad Setser)

“Despite their dismal reputation, the oil speculators provide a vital service.”  (Economist.com)

Who is responsible for $150 crude oil?  (NYTimes.com also ClusterStock)

U.S. energy consumption as a percentage of GDP.   (Calculated Risk)

Putting a number on a toll biofuel demand has put on food prices.  (naked capitalism)

The life cycle of creativity.  (Free exchange)

The bubble in ‘everyday economics‘ books.  (Odd Numbers also Infectious Greed)

Another voice in the ‘WSJ.com is going free‘ camp.  (The Long Tail)

Low probability, high consequence events.  Measuring the odds of a meteorite collision with Earth.  (NYTimes.com)

Are you curious what other bloggers are saying about Abnormal Returns? So are we. Feel free to check them out.

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