Friday links: conservatorship chatter

11Jul08

Fannie Mae (FNM) and Freddie Mac (FRE) need ‘a lot more capital.’  (WSJ.com)

There is likely only one place to get it…Uncle Sam.  (DealBook, ibid)

Shareholders are not going to like to hear the word ‘conservatorship.’ (Aleph Blog, ClusterStock.com, Infectious Greed, DealBreaker.com)

However, don’t blame Alan Greenspan for this mess.  (FT Alphaville)

The corporate bond market has yet to feel the pinch of the GSE-crisis.  (MarketBeat)

Is 2008 the ‘End of the End of Industrial America‘?  (Deal Journal)

The ‘sum of the parts’ case for General Electric (GE).  (WSJ.com)

The S&P 500 might end today lower than where it was ten years ago.  (Crossing Wall Street)

Market sentiment is getting even gloomier.  (Bespoke Investment Group, ibid, Big Picture)

The recent challenge of keeping the faith in Freddie Mac and Bill Miller.  (Deal Journal also Afraid to Trade)

Creating an enduring hedge fund organization is no easy feat.  (Economist.com)

“[Money market] funds have become an unexpected headache for the financial industry, which is limping through one of its toughest periods since the Depression.”  (NYTimes.com)

“Over the long run, we think adding modest global exposure to one’s portfolio can boost overall income and total return, possibly supporting it in times when good fixed-income opportunities are harder to come by through domestic markets.”  (Morningstar.com)

“(I)f you’re a strategic acquirer paying cash, bear markets are your friend, and make it much easier to get deals done.”  (Market Movers)

What kind of bear market are we in for?  (Odd Numbers)

Inside the new hedge fund replication mutual funds.  (IndexUniverse.com)

A 120 new ETFs and ETNs have debuted in 2008.  (SmartMoney.com)

TIPS should be a worry-free investment, but worries over the construction of CPI cloud the issue.  (Free exchange)

Is the U.S. heading for a Japanese-style ‘lost decade‘?  (naked capitalism)

What can we expect from the iPhone ‘application ecosystem’?  (A VC)

Have we missed an interesting post in the investment blogosphere? If so, feel free to drop Abnormal Returns a line.

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