Wednesday links: out of options

20Aug08

Fannie and Freddie are having to pay up to place their debt and are rapidly “running out of options.”  (WSJ.com, NYTimes.com also Market Movers)

The consensus is now that Fannie and Freddie will be nationalized, in some form or fashion.  (naked capitalism, Mish, ClusterStock.com)

One investor desperately needs a stock-friendly bailout.  (FT Alphaville)

Insolvency and illiquidity often go hand in hand.  (Aleph Blog)

Looking for themes in relative bond sector performance.  (TraderFeed)

Global vs. domestic sector performance.  (Bespoke Investment Group)

Focus on volatility not put/call ratios.  (Daily Options Report)

Why did anyone think the universal bank business model would ever work?  (Information Arbitrage)

Maybe the investment banks should move back to a partnership model?  (DealBook)

“Sometimes stocks move and we know why. More often, stocks move and we don’t know why, which doesn’t stop journalists from guessing.”  (Market Movers)

A closer look at the Benjamin Graham inspired ETNs.  (IndexUniverse.com)

Historically what is a realistic core CPI rate?  (Bespoke Investment Group)

Do mutual fund managers’ “best ideas” pay off?  (SSRN.com)

Do the best hedge funds hedge?  (SSRN.com)

A nice example of how a little bit of statistical knowledge can be a misleading.  (Freakonomics)

A review of the new book by Robert Shiller on the causes and consequences of the housing bubble.  (TheStreet.com)

Did the economic stimulus actually stimulate the economy?  (macroblog)

Is the Anglo-American conception of the firm “too rigid”?  (Free exchange)

A profile of Obama’s “geek economist” Austan Goolsbee.  (Technology Review)

What makes for a good blog?  (43 Folders)

On the limits of human performance, why does the world record in the 100 meters keep dropping?  (Infectious Greed)

Those guys in Chicago will trade anything.  Trading in options on Cubs post-season tickets is brisk.  (Marketwatch.com)

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