Friday links: accuracy and usefulness

29Aug08

Fannie and Freddie employees have taken a hit in the value of their ESOP accounts.  (NYTimes.com)

Without some plausible reason it is difficult to believe September is a particularly bad month for the stock market.  (Marketwatch.com)

Gold seasonality is about to turn positive through the end of the year.  (Trader’s Narrative)

12(b)-1 fees at closed mutual funds are like a bad cold that just keeps hanging around.  (Marketwatch.com)

“When you are investing actual money with actual capital that has actual limits, it is important to have some sort of discipline that keeps bad trade from obliterating you both literally and figuratively.”  (Daily Options Report)

“No single metric, whether it be Sharpe, Sortino, whatever, captures enough about any distribution of returns to be worth using in isolation. The key in my opinion is to use multiple metrics.”  (Bill Rempel)

(F)utures markets are not predictions markets. They’re really odds setting markets.”  (Crossing Wall Street)

Eddie Lampert’s strategy for Sears Holdings (SHLD) has “failed.”  (breakingviews/WSJ.com)

The implementation of IFRS is going to jumble up the financial landscape.  (Aleph Blog)

A longer term look at investment grade corporate bond spreads.  (World Beta)

Why the credit crisis is lasting so darn long.  (Economist.com)

“(G)overnment statistics in general, and GDP statistics in particular, are continuing their long and steady decline in terms of accuracy and usefulness.”  (Market Movers)

“But while GDP is not yet shrinking (at least not according to the current data), there’s still a good chance in the future, as the slowdown spreads across borders.”  (Econbrowser)

What damage might Gustav, or another hurricane, wreak on an already weak economy?  (Real Time Economics also VIX and More)

Despite historically slower economic growth, has India positioned itself better than China for future growth?  (Real Time Economics)

If you are going to plagiarize, it makes sense to plagiarize from the best.  (Joe Nocera)

How Major League Baseball Advanced Media rakes in $450 million in revenue a year.  (BusinessWeek.com)

Have we missed an interesting post in the investment blogosphere? If so, feel free to drop Abnormal Returns a line.

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