Friday links: bailout bonanza

19Sep08

The Fed will not make the same mistakes as they did in 1929.  They will make their own unique mistakes.  (Real Time Economics)

Don’t like lower stock prices?  Blame the short sellers and ban short selling.  (NYTimes.com, Market Movers, Infectious Greed, NakedShorts, Big Picture, Aleph Blog)

Pakistan, redux.  (DealBreaker.com, Market Movers)

RTC 2.0 is in the works. (NYTimes.com, Dealscape, ClusterStock.com)

Hastily put together rules often make “bad markets and bad policies.”  (footnoted.org, Alea)

“There’s no such thing as a choice-free bailout.”  (Interfluidity)

Does the smorgasbord of government interventions hold together?  (Economist’s View)

Big Ben literally found the perfect minute to cause the most pain to options sellers.”  (Daily Options Report)

The global markets have rebounded.  (Bespoke Investment Group)

This week has generated a lot of charts like this one.  (Alea)

Asset managers were next on the hit parade.  (MarketBeat)

Redemptions roiled the money market mutual fund biz.  The Feds step in.   (Mish, MarketBeat, WSJ.com, Marketwatch.com)

Risk aversion reached extremes this week as the money markets froze.”  (Economist.com)

Warren Buffett, vulture investor.  (Deal Journal)

“Can we measure the connectedness of financial institutions econometrically?”  (Economist’s View)

“How can short-selling destroy a good company?”  (EconLog)

ETN credit risk “rears its ugly head.”  (Morningstar.com)

What countries really deserve to be called emerging markets?  (Economist.com)

Examining the returns to the carry trade adjusted for “crash risk.”  (SSRN.com)

There’s always a bull market somewhere.  (Odd Numbers)

You should have been studying “fractal geometry” to understand market volatility.  (SciAm.com)

Harvard beats Yale! (NYTimes.com)

Twitter and StockTwits shine in a time of crisis.  (Howard Lindzon)

Big personnel moves in the financial blogosphere.  (Market Movers, ValleyWag, Going Private)

How bad was music in the 1980s?  (NPR.org)

Have we missed an interesting post in the investment blogosphere? If so, feel free to drop Abnormal Returns a line.

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