Sunday links: worst decade ever

08Feb09

The worst decade ever for the S&P 500 just ended.  (NYTimes.com also Clusterstock)

As bad as his timing has been with Tribune Corp., Sam Zell top ticked the real estate market with his sale of Equity Office Properties.  (NYTimes.com)

Mohamed El-Erian, “Don’t become hostage to historical definitions of asset classes. Be flexible, because there will be opportunities that don’t fit easily into those categories.”  (Kiplingers.com via The Guru Investor)

A mixed sentiment picture.  (Trader’s Narrative)

The number of funds on the ETF Deathwatch is growing.  (Invest With An Edge)

This bear market will punish ALL the weak. America’s retail system is broke and none more broken than consumer electronics.”  (Howard Lindzon)

It costs a pretty penny to maintain a short on Sears Holding (SHLD) at this point.  (WSJ.com)

Speaking of retail, Bill Ackman’s high profile bet on Target (TGT) has not played out as he expected.  (Dealbreaker, The Ideas Report, Market Movers)

Is fundamental indexing all it is cracked up to be?  (Morningstar.com)

Does America really need 7,770 mutual funds?  (BloggingStocks)

News flash.  Cramer’s stock picks still stink.  (Barrons.com also Big Picture)

No one is immune.  The Harvard endowment cuts staff.  (WSJ.com)

Emerging market bonds are not longer yoked to the broader high yield market.  (Marketwatch.com)

“Wall Street imploded largely because the inmates — the star traders and quant geniuses — took over the asylum. Paying the wardens less won’t put the inmates back in their cells.”  (WSJ.com)

Bank executive compensation caps done right.  (The Baseline Scenario)

The proposed TARP plan is just too darn complex (and ineffective).  (Information Arbitrage also The Balance Sheet)

The US economy needs to eliminate debt not just shove it onto the balance sheets of the Fed and the Treasury.  (Barrons.com also Infectious Greed)

The central bank’s balance sheet is in fact contracting. Maybe. But is it policy tightening? Doubtful.”  (macroblog)

“It is one thing to identify a higher national saving rate as the long-term goal, and quite another thing to try to get there overnight in the form of a sudden drop in consumption spending.”  (Econbrowser also Marginal Revolution)

What has Rick Bookstaber got against blogs? (Market Movers)

Recent trends aside, America is not in irreversible decline.  (Slate.com)

No wonder the SI swimsuit issue gets bigger every year.  (Silicon Alley Insider)

Are you curious what other bloggers are saying about Abnormal Returns? So are we. Feel free to check out a compilation of reviews.

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