Thursday links: near misses

12Feb09

You “the American Consumer” made the list of the 25 people to blame for the financial crisis.  (Time.com)

Don’t forget the credit rating agency Moody’s (MCO) played in this mess.  (The Daily Beast)

With bankruptcy looming, a fight is brewing over Sirius XM Radio (SIRI).  (DealBook, breakingviews.com, Digital Daily)

Real treasury yields are moving lower.  (EconomPic Data)

Do we need more bond ETFs?  (IndexUniverse.com, ibid)

(I)nvestors have pushed back into munis, and their yields are roughly equal with Treasuries of comparable maturities.”  (BusinessWeek.com)

Why is day-to-day mean reversion increasing?  (MarketSci Blog)

A closer look at the global momentum factor.  (SSRN.com)

CNBC gets in the wayback machine to find a doom and gloomer.  (Trader’s Narrative)

What portfolio changes has the Harvard endowment made?  (WSJ.com, Infectious Greed)

Is all “big firm research” worthless?  (Big Picture)

For financial advisers, “Cramer is just the tip of the iceberg.”  (New Rules of Investing)

Any one want to buy a second-hand hedge fund stake?  (Clusterstock)

Private equity firm mergers are a bad idea.  (peHUB.com)

Is the UK in deep trouble?  (Clusterstock)

The market simply isn’t buying the bad-bank plan.  (The Big Money)

“The reality is that our current problems are more the result of Wall Street’s stupidity and recklessness than its corruption (though there was plenty of that). And dealing with that problem is quite a bit more challenging.”  (The Balance Sheeet)

“Just to repeat, the key lesson in crisis resolution is transparency. I hope the results of the bank stress test will be made public, and the zombie banks clearly identified.”  (Calculated Risk also naked capitalism)

A “different geography” will arise out of this economic downturn.  (The Atlantic)

Animal Spirits by Robert Shiller and George Akerlof comes highly recommended.  (Infectious Greed, Alea)

In light of the 200th anniversary of Darwin’s birth, maybe we should be looking at the economy through an evolutionary perspective.  (Seed)

A history of near misses comes to end.  A satellite collision occurs.  (WSJ.com, Gizmodo, BBC News)

Near misses” increase the desire to keep gambling.  (Scientific American)

The economy stinks.  Online dating is booming.  (NYTimes.com also Freakonomics)

“But the truth is, no one gets Twitter at first.”  Hence a Twitter primer. (Portfolio.com, NYTimes.com)

Thanks for checking in with Abnormal Returns. Feel free to contact us with any questions and/or comments.

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