Thursday links: leveraged volume

19Feb09

Just how bad has the start of 2009 been for the Dow?  (Bespoke)

Time to think about the long side?  (Howard Lindzon)

Buffett vs. Soros.  Who will prove correct?  (NYPost.com also Bespoke)

Earnings estimates can be really, really wrong.  (Crossing Wall Street)

Betting against Eastern Europe has been a winning bet in 2009.  (WSJ.com)

Seriously, don’t follow the lead of the government when investing.  (Alea Blog)

David Swensen, “I’d say U.S. Treasuries are incredibly unattractive. That’s not hard. Pretty much everything else is very attractive.”  (ProPublica via Infectious Greed)

The much talked about Santelli rant.  (CNBC.com)

The implied volume of the underlying stocks due to the trading of leveraged ETFs is staggering.  (Daily Options Report)

The ongoing controversy over dollar cost averaging.  (The Big Money)

Changing the way they roll their contracts does not affect the fundamental issue with U.S. Oil Fund (USO).  (WSJ.com)

No wonder mutual fund managers tend to underperform.  (1-2 Knockout)

As fundamental indexing becomes more popular, re-balancing and implementation costs could easily take away any gains from the underlying investment concept.”  (Humble Student)

Chalk one up for David Einhorn.  (Zero Hedge)

A great paper “A Quantitative Approach to Tactical Asset Allocation” gets an update.  (World Beta)

Is Barclays Global Investors for sale?  (FT Alphaville)

Another ETF provider tries to crack the market for single country funds.  (IndexUniverse.com)

“I’m still far from convinced that the bond-insurer business model really works any more, or, for that matter, any business model which was or is reliant on a triple-A credit rating.”  (Market Movers)

Blogs played a key role in the uncovering of the Stanford International fraud.  (Free exchange)

Inflation tiptoes back on to the screen.  (Clusterstock, Capital Spectator, EconomPic Data also Bespoke)

Three of the four biggest  banks don’t fare very well under a ‘stress test.’  (Time.com)

Congress must be pretty gullible if they take the automaker’s plans seriously.  (Dealscape)

“Welcome to the Obama Homeowner Affordability and Stability Plan — a complicated wealth redistribution scheme dressed up as a cure for the nation’s housing woes.”  (Deal Journal)

More reactions to the Obama housing plan.  (Calculated Risk, Economix, Free exchangeAtlantic Business, Marginal Revolution, Baseline Scenario)

Nationalization, by whatever name, is the consensus position on the banks.  (naked capitalism)

George Akerlof, “Economics needs to be an accurate description of human nature — an accurate description of how people actually behave.”  (Atlantic Business)

“(S)cientists are being far too selfish with their data, and most empirical papers aren’t replicable in any kind of realistic sense. ”  (Market Movers)

There are some examples of successful paid subscription models on the Internet.  (Slate.com)

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