Friday links: thesis is still intact

03Apr09

Something happened at the G20 meeting to actually get people excited.  (Breakingviews, Daniel Drezner, Felix Salmon, Economix, Alea)

The unemployment rate jumps to 8.5%, a level not seen since 1983.  (NYTimes.com, Real Time Economics, Real Time Economics, Curious Capitaist, Clusterstock, EconomPic Data)

Banks got pretty much what they wanted in the change of mark-to-market rules.  (Baseline Scenario, Clusterstock, Curious Capitalist)

Are we making too big a deal out of the change to mark-to-market rules?  (Infectious Greed, Accrued Interest, Floyd Norris)

The head of the FHLB resigns over “his discomfort vouching for bank’s financial statements.”  (Zero Hedge, FT Alphaville)

Big shock.  Big banks plan on gaming the government’s plan for toxic assets.  (Clusterstock, FT.com, naked capitalism)

“(W)hen you get a call from the broker who sold a bad idea, and the broker tells you “Our thesis is still intact,” you run—don’t walk—to your computer and “Sell-Sell-Sell.””  (Jeff Matthews)

When it comes to stock picking “fundamentals matter, valuations matter and technicals matter.”  (BusinessWeek.com)

Firms that actually complete announced stock buyback programs tend to outperform.  (Empirical Finance Research)

Is Toyota (TM) the next Sony (SNE)?  (Zero Beta)

Even an insider like Pimco is finding it difficult to make money in distressed mortgage assets.  (peHUB, Crossing Wall Street)

The Fed is pretty much holding up the mortgage market single-handedly.  (WSJ.com)

Some indicators that are not confirming the current market optimism.  (Zero Hedge)

Can the Fed keep inflationary expectations “tethered”?  (Economist’s View)

There are a number of good reasons to treat Detroit more harshly than Wall Street.  (Breakingviews)

What is the real run rate for the auto industry post-“auto bubble“?  (WashingtonPost.com)

“But it is easy to get carried away during a boom; the strength of financial markets tends to be seen as a signal that the economy is soundly based.”  (Economist.com)

Tim Geithner and the Federal Reserve “..relied too much on assurances from senior banking executives that their firms were safe and sound.”  (WashingtonPost.com)

Yet another example why correlation does not imply causation.  (Atlantic Business)

Twitter is not going to be bought by Google (GOOG), at least not yet.  (AllThingsD, Silicon Alley Insider, GigaOM)

Rave reviews fore AlphaClone and Dr. Brett’s The Daily Trading Coach.  (market folly, Trader Mike)

What Moneyball missed.  (American.com via The Sports Economist)

StockCharts.com celebrates its tenth anniversary with some sweet deals.  (StockCharts.com)

Have we overlooked an interesting post in the investment blogosphere? If so, feel free to drop Abnormal Returns a line.

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