Thursday links: revenue problems

14May09

Apparently everybody wants to get into the actively managed ETF business.  (IndexUniverse.com)

You asked for a small cap Brazil ETF, you got it.  The Market Vectors Brazil Small-Cap (BRF) launches.  (ETF Trends)

How much can a mutual fund act like a hedge fund?  (market folly)

More on how to implement a “polynary trading strategy.”  (Condor Options)

“Financial crises, of course, do have a funny effect on financial products [futures-based commodity ETFs] which in theory work perfectly.”  (FT Alphaville)

Which Berkshire Hathaway (BRK-A) holdings are currently attractively valued.  (Value Expectations)

The hedge-fund industry collects heavy tolls for what is supposed to be (but rarely is) exceptional performance. Maybe sometimes it’s worthwhile to pay those fees. But almost certainly not if half of them go to middlemen…”  (The Big Money)

At multi-generational lows, can Treasury yields really fall much further?  (Research Reloaded)

Money market funds have reduced their dependence on Treasury guarantees.  (WSJ.com)

Fundamental indexation looks to different underlying variables.  (SSRN.com)

Want to buy a piece of the stub that is Lehman Bros.?  (WSJ.com)

What kind of conditions does a steep yield curve imply?  (EconomPic Data)

Is the SEC barking up the wrong tree in proposing to restrict short sales?  (Zero Hedge)

It is hard to escape the math of falling housing prices.  (Clusterstock)

The implications of hedging your home’s value with new housing ETFs.  (Caveman Forecaster)

Why is Freddie doing better, on a relative basis, than Fannie?  (WSJ.com)

More on the Obama administration’s approach to the “rule of law” in this financial crisis.  (WashingtonPost.com, The Market Ticker)

Does the Treasury not know how to value TARP warrants, or do they just not care?  (Clusterstock)

Great advice from the late Bill Seidman for banking regulators.  (Calculated Risk)

“One surprising consequence of the financial crisis is that not many CEOs have been fired.”  (Atlantic Business)

The states, especially California, have a revenue problem.  (Economix, Mish)

Chalk one up for Norwegian prudence.  (NYTimes.com also The Reformed Broker)

Breaking down what VCs would earn on an OpenTable IPO.  In short, not much. (peHUB)

VCs don’t read business plans.  (DealBook)

Has Twitter jumped the shark?  (Bits, Mashable)

“..credit-card companies are becoming much more interested in understanding their customers’ lives and psyches, because, the theory goes, knowing what makes cardholders tick will help firms determine who is a good bet…”  (NYTimes.com)

A long-term longitudinal study examines the factors behind happiness and ‘the good life.’ (TheAtlantic.com via The Skeptical Hypochondriac)

You can now follow Abnormal Returns on Twitter at @abnormalreturns.  Check it out.

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